Top 3 Girl Power Icons

Today’s society has meant it is an exciting time to be a woman. Issues once seen as taboo are now being addressed by wider society, and women are now in a position to stand up for what they believe in and – most importantly –  have those concerns acknowledged and addressed throughout society. Issues that range from the glass ceiling and wage gaps to sexual harassment and gender stereotyping are now being addressed throughout society and steps are now being taken across the globe to have them addressed. With this in mind, there are now powerful and strong female role models to look up to throughout popular culture. So here are a few that have helped to shape the role that women play within society.

Wonder Woman

One of the most iconic women, Wonder Woman has always been a powerful and strong picture of a woman. Throughout comic history she has been one of the main power players in the DC universe and is to this day an iconic image of Girl Power. Her most recent portrayal by Gal Gadot in the 2017 movie received critical acclaim as not only being one of few movies to show women as powerful, fierce warriors instead of sexualised eye candy, as well as being one of the most successful superhero movies of the entire year. This film also highlighted what a difference female directors have compared to their male counterparts: Wonder Woman showed the Amazonian Women as fierce warriors prepared for battle, whereas the Justice League portrayed them as women who go to battle in short shorts and push up bras. Wonder Woman has been, and always will be, one of the key examples of just how strong women can be and just how much influence they can have on the people around them.

Image result for wonder woman gifsYou don’t stand a chance


The beautiful ‘princess’ of Rohan, she is introduced in The Two Towers as the deeply saddened and tormented niece of the King of Rohan. While her portrayl in the film is still one of a powerful woman, the book helps cement her as a true hero within the Lord of the Rings books. In the film, she is indeed doe-eyed and love-struck with Aragorn (but then again…what woman could remain cool with Viggo Mortsensen staring at them…we are only human) but even in the film she is determined to fight for what she believes in. She sneaks into the battle at Minas Tirith so that she can finally fight as an equal with her brother and help to protect her family’s honour and her people. She defeats the Witch King. In the film, while she is scared (and rightly so!) she managed to fight him and kill him all while making a brilliant one liner: I am no man. In the book, she is even more of a powerhouse: While she is still infatuated with Aragorn, his unwanted comments about how a woman’s place is away from a battlefield, she does not hesitate in calling out what a sexist ass he is being. She also laughs at the Witch King when he says that no man can kill him, because she is not a man and will smite him no matter how evil he believes himself to be. I mean….damn!

Image result for eowyn lord of the rings gifsFirst introduced in The Two Towers

Arya Stark

It can be hard to pick just one powerful female lead within the Game of Thrones franchise, as George R R Martin makes most (if not all) of his female leads forces to be reckoned with. One of the most endearing of these though is Arya, the youngest daughter of the Stark household. While her sister grows to become a power player throughout the books (and TV series), Arya is consistently badass from the beginning: She is routinely disciplined for wanting to learn sword play rather than sewing patterns and makes her way through the story to become a fierce young warrior cable of even more powerful acts than her male counterparts. Throughout her complicated story arc, she learns how to make her way in a male dominated world and uses her wits to outsmart the majority of her peers at every turn.

Image result for arya stark gifsValar Morghulis



Vintage vs Old

It has long been a trope that if something is vintage then it automatically worth more: Clothing, toys, jewels, furniture. You name it and the chances are that the longer it has been in circulation that the more value it has accrued over that time. Yet these items may not necessarily be ‘old’ items. More importantly, when does something stop being seen as ‘old’ and starts being seen as ‘vintage’?

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‘Vintage’ and ‘old’ are subjective terms: What one person would consider old another person doesn’t mean that it is actually an old item. One clear example of this is in toys: We as adults would look at a toy that has been in circulation for a year and deem it still relative, whereas a child may look at that toy and deem it old because it is not the newest version available to them. The same can also be said for fashion: Your mom may look at her teenage clothing from the 70’s and 80’s equipped with shoulder pads and spikes and see them as an old remnant of her past, whereas a high end thrift store in London would view those clothes as ‘vintage’ time pieces and be able to charge twice their value to sell it on.

The terminology also varies on what the item on question is: If a car is more than 20 years old, it is considered a ‘classic’ and is only known as ‘vintage’ if it was made between 1919 and 1930. ‘Vintage’ originally came from wine making, where ‘vintage’ wines were made from grapes that were grown and harvested within the same year and so are a representation of a very specific year of harvest.

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‘Vintage’ has now also become a sign of quality and is therefore desirable, whereas ‘old’ suggests that the item is simply no longer fit for use and outdated. In reality, while those shoes you have from last year may be technically ‘old’ they still work perfectly well (provided that they have no hole sin the bottom), whereas that vintage car which was made in the 1980’s may break down at every slight curve in the road. See…subjective.

The implications

Since the terminology is subjective, it allows retailers and designers to state what they believe their items should be labelled as. Etsy, for example, requires their users to only name a handmade item as ‘vintage’ if it is at least 20 years old. In the fashion industry, ‘vintage’ is used to describe an item that is easily identifiable to the time in which it was made. Going back to shoulder pads, despite your own personal opinion on whether they are wise fashion choices or not, jackets that contained them would most likely be considered vintage because they are iconic of 80s style.

It can therefore be difficult to distinguish between what is really vintage and what is simply ‘vintage style’, as items that imitate clothing of a particular era are not equal to those items that were originally made in an era. Clothing needs to be of  a particular quality for it to be considered vintage too as it needs to be able to stand the test of time: if that ‘vintage’ shirt starts to fade or the buttons slowly gape after a few washes then it’s probably not ‘real vintage’ but rather an ‘old’ item of clothing.

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The problem with labels is that they are all subjective and can, and most definitely will, change over time as new definitions are determined. If you are truly looking for something vintage it may be best looking for something that you deem as vintage: High quality items from a specific time period that brings that vintage joy into your lives, be it through an old jacket found at your local charity shop to a designer dressing table made in the 1950s. Just because something is labelled ‘vintage’, doesn’t mean it is, and just because something is labelled ‘old’, doesn’t mean it can’t still bring you joy.

Never Alone review

Created by Upper One Games, this is a puzzle-platform game centred around the stories of Alaskan Natives. It follows the story of a young girl and her companion fox on her adventure to discover the source of terrible blizzards that are ravaging her village.

The stories

Based on the  traditional Iñupiaq tale “Kunuuksaayuka”, you play as a Inuit girl named Nuna. She, along with her arctic fox companion, set out to find what is causing terrible blizzards that are destroying her village. As you play, different stories and tales from Alaskan natives weave themselves in the story and become sub-levels in their own right. In one chapter, you encounter the Sky People which originate from the story of how the aurora borealis came about: Children who got too close to the lights were plucked from the earth and now dance in the sky to lure more children to their beautiful but dark world. The stories are blended together pretty seamlessly and provide a good overview of all of the different stories told by the Inuit people.

The game is also very intimate: whenever one of the playable characters dies, the other character still alive curls up into a ball and cries (I am not joking) and the camera slowly fades to black while also giving you a close up of their devastated faces. It is like the game is punishing you for being so rash with your decisions, and trust me…after the second or third time this happens you really will take your time to think about the different choices available.

The game play

The game follows the same sort of style as Limbo and Little Nightmares, mostly focused around solving puzzles while running from the elements and animals around you. Being set in Alaska, the biggest enemy you face is the environment: The water will freeze you, the winds can sweep you away and the sub-zero temperatures can leave you stranded if you do not think fast enough. Throughout the game you have to switch between playing as Nuna and as the fox, as each has their own set abilities: Nuna can lift and pull items, throw them if needed and use the one weapon you are given, while the fox can jump to hard to reach places and also interact with the spirit guides that you use throughout the game. This also means the game can be played co-op with one player controlling each character, but as a single player game it also adds another degree of thought as you also need to think fast about which character you need to use at any given time and for each individual situation.

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As you play, you also unlock ‘cultural insights’ which are interviews and stories with Alaskan natives that provide more background information as to what you are about to play through. For me, this was really interesting, as you got to learn about a new culture while also seeing how the game developers used these stories to inspire different aspects throughout the game. For example, the only weapon you are given is not actually used as a weapon: The Bola is made up of a collection of weights that are tied onto the end of an intertwining cord that is spun around and thrown at a given target. In the game, you use this mostly to break ice blocks that are in your way or distract enemies while you escape. This lack of violence also relates to the Alaskan ideology that all of nature is balanced and that every action that challenges this can have very severe consequences.

Over all?

Definitely worth a play! If you want to play a game with a steady pace and an interesting story, then this is the one for you. The puzzle-platform nature of the game also means that there is no close combat interaction, so if you aren’t very keen on that type of play (I for one can not aim anything to save my life!) this game can give you adrenaline as well as a brain teaser while you play. It is beautifully made, with gorgeous images and a story just complex enough to keep you interested without being overwhelmingly complicated. The added notes about the Alaskan culture also makes the story more enjoyable, as you almost get a glimpse into how this culture lives on a daily basis.

Planning a story

NaNoWriMo awakened something within me, and that something is that I now can not stop writing: On my drive to work I am creating new characters, when I talk to me colleagues I start thinking about which conversations can spark a new subplot, and when I’m lying in bed trying to go to sleep I am thinking of different plot devices to push my characters and my story forward.

In doing so, I have (or at least i like to think that I have) created an easy to follow and easy to organise plan. I thought I’d share this with you all because I would have loved to have had some sort of guide when I first started writing stories fully.

Start with the basics

When I get an idea that I think I can run with, I usually start with three main areas:

  • The World: where is it set? What are the main locations? What are the main characteristics of each place?
  • The Characters: Who, what, when, where and why?
    • WHO are they? What is their name, age, personality. What makes them who they are and what events in their life have shaped them.
    • WHERE are they in relation to the World?
    • WHAT are they? If you’re writing a fantasy story, what race are they? Are they necessarily human? You could even be writing from the point of view of an animal or hybrid or even a plant.
    • WHEN do they become important to the story? If you are working with one main character, you may try to plan when they start to develop their character arc. If you have lots of sub-characters, you may have to plan when each one starts to interact with the main character or when they become important to the story.
    • WHY are they important? What is it about them that makes them necessary for your story to progress. What do they add to a scene or the overall story that no other character can add.
  • The main story: How does your story begin and how does it end? What events would you like to happen throughout the story? I find it is best to start as vague as possible – main character meets new character who changes something. Figure out how you can get the story to flow through your main milestones and then see how your characters can aid in that progress.

Image result for writing gifsPusheen loves to plan

Write it down

Being a visual learner, I like to be able to see all of my notes in front of me, and when creating a story I like to be able to add notes as when needed. Most times, I will do this in a notebook that I will section off into the three main parts. Then when I get a random idea pop into my head during the day I can write it down in the section. I can also look back through my ideas and reevaluate some of them: As I begin to develop my characters more I may see that some of the milestones I had thought of no longer seem relevant to my characters journey and therefore need to be rethought or changed around a bit.

If you are not a visual learner, find a way of keeping notes that works for you: You may want to look at keeping audio notes through the use of a Dictaphone or audio messages to yourself. It could be helpful to draw story boards for certain scenes or events to help you work out how you want it to play out in writing. However it is, keeping a trail will help you keep on top of your ideas and help you organise your story.

Start with setting the scene

Despite having so many ideas you may find that when you actually sit down to start writing you don’t know how to begin. When this happens to me (which is almost always) I find it helps to describe the setting first. What is the weather like? Does it have a particular smell to it? What colour is everything? It can be as basic or as detailed as you like and can always be completely removed in the editing stage of your writing. Once you’ve written a few sentences, you will most likely find that the scene starts to play out on it’s own and you won’t even be thinking about what is going down on paper.

Image result for writing gifsBilbo knew how to start a story…

Imagine you are watching the events before you

As with the above, if you find a scene is lacking something to help it along, I find a good trick to pretend that I am witnessing the events playing out in front of me: Am I stood in the office where the main character is having a brutal throw-down with their boss, or am I watching an old film about an ancient priest summoning evil spirits. When you can see it in your head it is easier to write down what is happening. Again, this can be as detailed as you like. It may be as simple as one character walking towards another person, but you can then build up to describe the gait of each character and the look of intent in each pair of eyes.


At the end of the day, writing should be fun. It should be the one thing you do that is solely and exclusively for you. When you’re first writing, don’t focus on what other readers may think of the scene, or what critics may say about your sentence structure. Write because you have a story to tell that only you can tell. If you don’t feel like writing one day, or the words just won’t seem to come out, then just walk away from it for a moment: Go and make yourself a cup of tea, do some household chores, watch a movie, hang out with friends and family and completely forget about the story. The words will come back to you when they’re ready to and you will be back on track.

Have you guys got any tips for writing? Let me know in the comments and share the lovely tips and tricks that you have found work wonders.

T xxx


Must haves for NaNoWriMo

With NaNoWriMo starting on Wednesday, I thought I would compile a list of Must Have Items for NaNoWriMo. As this is my first attempt, I have done a lot of research as to how people make it through each day, progressing their story and, hopefully, winning NaNoWriMo.

1. Routine

The main thing people seem to swear by is a dedicated Writing Time. Once November 1st hits, allocate a certain amount of time everyday to writing and try and make it the same everyday. For me, I will most likely do all of my writing once I get home…perhaps while I wait for dinner to cook…from 7-9ish. My mornings are mine to get gym out of the way, watch my YouTube, catch up on Netflix, do online shopping. But my evenings will be for writing and developing my story as the month progresses on. Try and set aside a dedicated writing time with no distractions from your story.

2. Set yourself challenges

Most people set themselves little personal challenges. These can be as simple as certain word counts at certain points in the calendar: 10,000 every week, 25,000 by the 15th November, you get the idea. Many of the social groups and forums also recommended a ‘Double Up Day’ where you try to double your word count in one day of writing. These little challenges will help you stay motivated, as you are not always doing the same old writing day every day for a month. It can also give you a new sense of accomplishment, knowing that you take your writing to a new level.

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3. Rewards

No matter how dedicated you are to your story, as with any project there needs to be some sort of reward scheme in place for you to continue through. It can be hard to work solidly on one thing for a long amount of time with no break, and soon you’ll view it as nothing more than a chore that you have to do rather than a project you want to do. Maybe every time you reach a target (see above) you allow yourself to watch one episode of your favourite TV show, or a YouTube video. If you’ve managed to do a Double Up Day, then you are allowed the following day off…or at least only have to write half of your daily target.

4. Back up devices

No matter how you are writing your story (while most people do it on a computer, but some are choosing to do it by hand) make you have a back up system in place. If using a computer BACK YOUR STUFF UP. Even if you just email yourself a copy of the document at the end of everyday just n case, have something in place so you have more than one copy of your work. If you are writing by hand, maybe take pictures every time you finish a page of your notebook so you know where you have gotten in your story in case you lose the notebook or spill a drink on it. It is best to be too careful than to be left, after 30,000 of your story, with nothing to show for it thanks to a computer glitch or a spilt drink across your notebook.

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5. Pen and paper

If you are working with a computer, never underestimate the use of pen and paper. If you are a Pantser, making it up as you go along and just seeing where the story takes you, it can be helpful to just have a list on the go of places that you’ve created, characters that have appeared, names you like the sound of that you may want to incorporate, main plot points that have happened or you would like to happen. This is almost a midway point between a Pantser and a Planner, which allows you to let your imagination to run wild and dictate your story, while sill allowing you to keep a record of the key points just in case you need to refer back.

Any other tips you have? Let me know in the comments…I need all the help i can get!!

T xx

The little things in life

Every day at work, at around 12.30pm, one of the council street cleaners will do her round outside of my office where I currently work. She pushes her cart, sweeps up old cigarette butts and crisp packets, before taking a 5 minute breather on the park bench. At around 12.45pm, the man I can only assume is her husband comes strolling out from one of the side streets with the tiniest and most excited pug puppy I have ever seen. The pug pulls his owner over to the lady, who meets him with almost equal excitement, and they have a little walk around the green patch of scenery close by, sit down, and have a little lunch break together.

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I have watched them enough times while I am waiting for my documents to print or for certain files to finish copying, that I have their routine down. I am very much a people watcher – leave me at a little coffee shop with a massive mug of tea, my book and a nice window seat and I could happily spend my day there watching the many passers by go about their business. It is one of my little pleasures in life, and one I wish I could do more. Plus, I genuinely believe that a proper cup of tea can cure all ailments…so that always helps!

The last couple of months have been pretty stressful for me for a whole array of reasons and while I sat watching the little pug bounce happily around his owners’ boots, I began wondering if it would ever be possible to be as happy as that little doggo. I feel that this is something that has been left off of the curriculum at schools: How to be happy. More importantly, how to be happy wherever you may be in life. Yes I may be 25, and as far as society is concerned I am a fully functioning adult that should be more than capable of looking after myself. In reality, I am not…or at least I don’t feel like an adult. I still live at home with my parents, I’m still on their car insurance and I have only very recently finished my education and managed to get my foot onto the career ladder of my choice. All the while I have my peers – or worse, the younger generation – working in high flying jobs for better pay, with their own mortgages and living the life that I at 16 thought I should be living at 25.

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However, every now and again I am reminded that life is short: With all the horrible things going on in this world from terrorist attacks, mass shootings and the threat of nuclear war, I am reminded that time is fleeting. My first 25 years have flown by and I already feel like I wasted so much of it worrying about things that did not even deserve a minute of my attention. Who cares if my hair is getting frizzy? Why do I care if I look tired or have bags under my eyes? Last night I stayed up until midnight (for the first time in months may I add) and watched a movie with my Dad, eating biscuits and candy and laughing about the events of Geordie Shore. Was I tired the next day? Ashamedly so. Did I regret my choice? Hell no. The little things in life, as cliche as it sounds, really will become the most important things.

So this is my message to you, lovely few of you who will read this, or stumble across it late at night by accident: Enjoy the little things. So what if your thighs are a little bit thick?! Revel in the fact that your legs are strong enough to carry you wherever you need to go. So what if your hair is super untame and won’t style right? When you’re 80 with thinning grey hair you will long for the wild locks of your youth. Ignore the negativity that other people will try to force on you because at the end of the day, the only person you need to impress is you. You are the only person you will have to live with every second of every day for the rest of your life, so you might as well learn how to love the little things that make you special.

Let me know what makes you guys grateful. What little everyday things make your day infinitely better?

Should Photoshop be illegal?

In recent years there has been a lot of controversy around the use of digital enhancement software: The main issue of debate tends to focus on the fashion industry, as it is argued that magazines and editorial shoots gives young people an unrealistic and, in many cases, dangerous expectation of how their bodies should look. But it does raise an important question, as to when – and if ever – digital enhancement is necessary.

Why use it?

For most people in the creative industries, photo-manipulation is a basic tool in every trade. You can use it to make photos stand out more by making certain colours pop while other colours are muted; It allows you to ‘revamp’ images over the years to keep up with the changing industries; it also allows you to perfect every image that you take by allowing you to remove blemishes, straighten out lines, level the contrast and so on. The possibilities really are rather limitless as you can essentially make any image you have into a completely new and maybe even completely different picture. Furthermore, photo-manipulation is not an easy task: Besides from needing a very steady hand and a keen eye for detail, you also need heaps of patience to be able to sit and stare at the same pixel images for many hours at a time while you work on a particular project. This means that the more you practice, the better you get, and if you are someone who wants to work in a creative industry, these skills are invaluable.

Does it really show skill?

On one hand, it does take a certain level of skill to manipulate a photo: Even if you are simply adjusting the colour ratios of a photo, you must still have at least a basic understanding of the software as well as an understanding of photo composition. However to some extent, it almost doesn’t matter if the photo you have taken is completely pants if you have the knowledge to manipulate the original into something artistic. On the other hand, can you still deem yourself an ‘artist’ or a ‘photographer’ if you need to rely on software to make your photo great?

Does it create false expectations?

One of the universal truths of modern day society is that when you compare yourself to other people, you are undoubtedly going to become sad and disappointed with what you have in life. This is made worse when the pictures you are looking at are not the entire truth of that person’s life, nor is it an accurate representation of society as a whole: As beautiful as celebrities can be and as flawless as the Victoria Secret models are, the majority of photos taken of them are then manipulated to look more appealing than they are. The time old story of ‘sex sells’ means that we are more likely to pay attention to a beautiful body than we are to the sight of your average person, even though the average person is an attainable role model to have. In recent years, fashion companies such as Dior have even banned super skinny models in their cat walks, so why are we not banning them in photographs?

The dangers?

To begin with, super skinny models only add to the stereotype that in order to be considered ‘beautiful’ you have to weigh as little as possible. This is not only bad for society, where the percentage of people with eating disorders is gradually rising every year, but it is also bad for the industries that condone them, as it almost suggest that they care about making money more than they care about the people who sell their clothes for them. It also portrays an image that the people in modelling campaigns are the ‘normal’ people of society, and it is everyone else who looks bizarre, when it reality it is the opposite way around. But not only do these people already have incredible bodies (simply because they work out, eat healthy and, mostly, because it is literally their job to look stunning) but then editors set to work to exaggerate the images more: legs get longer, skin gets smoother, lips become fuller, muscles get more defined, until we see an image that is not only a poor representation of society, but a bad representation of that model as a person, as though the hours they have spent in the gym and all that clean eating was pointless because a piece of software s what makes them look flawless in the end.

The upside?

Photo manipulation can be hours upon hours of fun and since the software is still surprisingly new, it is very hard to become a master of it. The software is constantly developing and improving and as such so are the skills that come along with it. It also is now becoming a sought after skill in the creative industry, with more and more employers wanting at least a basic understanding of photo manipulation software. It stands to reason that there is a clear need for it in society otherwise why such a high demand for the skill within the workforce? It could even be argued that photo manipulation is an art form in its own right, as it combines many different disciplines, while still requiring an in-depth knowledge of them all in order to create an image that is new and striking.

So what do you think? Is it really necessary in an artistic world, or is it doing more damage then it’s worth? Let me know 🙂

T xx


Annabelle Creation

I am a massive pansy when it comes to horror films, so anything even remotely creepy and I’ll probably have nightmares for weeks. So a few weeks ago, I was dumb enough to watch Annabelle. The film about the possessed doll and the many creepy things that happen while she is in the house. I have never watched any of the other Conjuring universe films so came to the film knowing very little about it, except for one thing: I HATE dolls…like seriously hate them. The only reason I watched this film is because I really hoped it would be bad. Like Chuckie. So bad that it is almost great.

I have never been so wrong in my life. 

The first film was pretty good: Good story, decent acting, just the right amount of suspense, and the horror was actually really good. I won’t give away too much information but if you want to watch a decent horror movie then definitely watch this one.

This weekend I agreed to go and see the sequel (which is actually a prequel?), Annebelle Creation, mainly because it was a pretty hectic week and mostly because we had free cinema tickets to use before September. BIG MISTAKE. I have barely slept for two days because of the horrible horror that I saw in this film.

The actors themselves

Now anyone who knows me knows that I’m not all that fond of kids…they creep me out. Mostly because everyone knows that if you want to make a horror movie you have at least two scenes with creepy kids singing a creepy nursery rhyme and there you have it: Horror movie. Horror aspect aside the kids were all pretty decent little actors…you genuinely believed that these were the types of kids who would end up in this situation. There was very little ‘hamming up’ that you normally see when children are on the big screen and so it all felt all too real. Which is apparently a good thing for a horror movie, but a horrid thing for scardey cat me.

The scares

Yes there were a few jumpscares, but I literally mean only a few. The worst parts of the film were the suspenseful pauses, where you would witness something horrible and then it would just fade into darkness. The other plus is that you very rarely saw the bad guy (the devil/monster/demony creature) and when you did it was only ever in the very corner of the screen or looking at it from behind, in the darkness, where you aren’t always certain what you are seeing. For me, that is what makes a good horror movie: Never reveal the monster, because 9 times out of 10 we can all tell it’s just a guy in a mask, or (most commonly) new CGI footage. By revealing the monster, all that happens is we realise that it is all fake. BUT…have multiple shots of scared looking kids, creepy little girls walking around at night with glowing eyes, and you are pretty much guaranteed a sleepless night.

Overall story

I enjoyed the story and the film did a great job of tying in the events of this film with the events that followed in the first (confusing, I know!). It explained how everything really came about, how Annabelle became Annabelle, the demon doll, and how the couple from the first film managed to get caught up in all of the horrible history. It also helped to explain more of the backstory as to why there was a possessed doll in the first place. And never underestimate the sheer terror of a close up shot of an unblinking, un-moving doll face with no noise in the back ground but for footsteps or breathing: In horror films, less really is more.

The film also helped to tie together the Conjuring universe in little Easter eggs. Having never seen the other films, I probably missed a lot of them. But they do mention the Nun from the Conjuring universe and that alone was enough to make me not want to watch the anticipated solo movie of the (ironic) demonic woman of God. Fans of the film would probably notice way more little nods to the original films and that is always a nice little touch to any film franchise, regardless of genre.

Bad points?

For me, it was exhausting dealing with the amount of suspenseful silences that filled this film. I was emotionally drained by about half way through! While I appreciate that all of them did add to the plot and did make the film that bit more realistic, I got really bored of this demon doll essentially screwing over a bunch of orphaned girls and a nun. A few of the scenes could have been shorter/not there at all and I don’t think this would have dramatically changed the film.

As with all prequels, you kind of know who is going to survive and who is going to die: You know from the outset that the doll is going to remain undamaged throughout this film, otherwise how did it turn up in the first one in such pristine condition. It also meant that you couldn’t get overly attached to the characters when you knew that at least the majority of them must have died in order for the doll to be so evil: If the doll did nothing but annoy and scare a few kids, why did it suddenly go on a killing spree in the first one? The doll wouldn’t be evil, just annoying.

That being said, it all hit the fan REALLY quick: One minute, they try to throw a doll down a well for sneaking into someones bed, and the next two people have been dismembered and are hanging up like Christmas lights around the house. It seems the monster went from mildly irritating to full-blown psychotic in less than 2 minutes, and while that was good to get things going, it probably didn’t have to take so long getting to that point to begin with. The scenes of screaming and running away were just as terrifying as the scenes of absolute silence and still frames, so maybe having a different pace would have belted this film up a notch.

Final thoughts?

I hate dolls. And no…I’m not including pictures because quite frankly I don’t want to relive the horror anymore than I already have. But the film is actually really good: Good horror, good logical story and a decent way to tie all the films together. Definitely go and watch this if you get the chance and definitely be prepared for a few sleepless nights as a result!

Have you guys seen it? Let me know what your thoughts were down below 🙂

T xx

Most expensive Star Wars toys

No one can deny that Star Wars is an insanely popular and well-loved franchise. The films have become a stable part of 20th Century cinema and even if you have never watched one of the films, the characters and universes are iconic: EVERYONE has made a ‘I am your father’ joke, as well as encouraged their friends to ‘trust the force’. It is also no surprise that the toys are highly sought after, and for a bit of ease of reference, here is a list of some of the most expensive Star Wars items ever created.

Rocket firing Boba Fett

Unsurprisingly, there are at least three Star Wars toys that are worth a stupid amount of money. The Rocket Firing Boba Fett toy released in 1980 currently sells for around £5,000. The toy was originally sold with a gun that shot out a small plastic rocket, but was quickly recalled when parents started to complain that this could injure their children. The toy was re-released without a firing gun, so naturally the original and almost ‘dangerous’ version is highly sought after by collectors and fans alike.


LEGO Ultimate Collector’s edition Millennium Falcon

Now yes, LEGO have since made roughly 3 other versions of the Millennium Falcon, but the most sought after is the original: Made in 2007 this model consisted of roughly 5195 pieces and was the first ship to be made on ‘mini-figure scale’. Currently selling online for around £3,200.00 it is clearly even more sought after now that it is no longer being made.Image result for lego r2d2Oddly enough, any large scale LEGO Star Wars set is going to be worth big bucks after being discontinued: The large scale R2 D2 model originally sold for around £140 in stores, but now that it has been discontinued for nearly 2 years, it is worth around £450…and that’s out of box and made! Completely sealed packet, that has never before touched bricks, could sell for as much as £800.

Telescopic lightsaber Darth Vader

As with almost all toys, the first run of this toy in 1978 was recalled because the lightsaber could extend and potentially injure the children playing with it. The toy was re-released sans extending lightsaber but it happened so quickly that there are only about 200 versions of the original in existence. Selling for around £6000.00, it is one of the most sought after Star Wars toys going.

Darth Vader war helmet

Ok so technically this is not a ‘toy’ so to speak but rather the actual helmet that Darth vader’s main stunt double wore during filming for ‘The Empire Strikes Back’. This is therefore more of an original film prop, which somewhat explains the £115,000.00 price tag on it currently.

real darth vader

What other Star Wars toys have you guys heard of? Or…which Star Wars toys that you currently own do you reckon will be worth big bucks in a few years time?

T xx


Jaws: Book vs Film

I’m sure I speak for everyone when I say that Jaws was a damn good movie. I saw it for the first time when I was about ten and I don’t think I took another bath ever again: Literally any body of water that I could submerge myself in was a no-go for fear of shark attack. I was ten…leave me alone. Recently in a little charity store I found the book of Jaws by Peter Benchley, and I have noticed quite some stark differences in them both.

SPOILER ALERT IN PLACE.…if you have not seen Jaws, or wish to read the book, do not read further!

1. The people

In the book, the most appealing character of the whole story is the shark. The people of Amity are seriously xenophobic: Anyone that is not from Amity is simply there for money-making. The whole town relies on the summer tourists visiting the town and the beach so much that everyone there has to struggle through the winter to afford to stay in a relatively expensive seaside town. The houses are all rented out to summer folk, businesses hike up prices, and the main beach is opened to attract everyone even though there’s a man-eating shark around. The town is also pretty corrupt: There is only one journalist who runs the local newspaper, and he is best friends with the chief of police and the Mayor. The Mayor is also funded, it turns out, by some New York mobsters before they invested so much

Even the main characters are pretty nasty people. In the film, the main characters are pretty likeable: Brody is your run-of-the-mill chief of police, keen on public safety and a loving relationship with his happy wife and happy children. In the book, he is blunt, old fashioned and, most of the time, drunk. His wife, Ellen, is bitter, yearning for her younger years of rich friends and socialite lifestyle. Hooper is a cocky and womanising young man, who’s arrogance is almost as high as his IQ. The only character is somewhat endearing in his unlike-ability is Quint, the aged shark hunter, and only because he makes no apologies for who he is: He knows he’s a bit of work, but owns it.

Image result for jaws gifs

2. The affair

One of the main things that the film doesn’t cover is the affair between Hooper and Ellen Brody. Having known each other as upper class children, Ellen begins to fantasise about having a fling with Hooper. He is everything that she feels she left behind when she chose to marry Brody and live in Amity: rich lifestyle, fancy dinners, big social events, and a high profile name. Hooper doesn’t say no, but throughout the book Hooper is simply your generic rich-kid: He is used to not being told what to do and so very rarely will do what is needed. He and Ellen, while it only lasts for one night, go about their affair with blatant disregard for Brody. But at the same time, Brody is such a detached husband you almost can’t really blame Ellen for wanting someone more attentive. In the end, the very brief fling makes Ellen realise how lucky she is to have Brody and how much she does love him. Plus…well it’s not like the affair could continue…

3. The deaths

While the film hit most of the key deaths – the opening scene is quite possibly iconic in the horror world – the book has a few extra ‘deaths’ that the film played on slightly. In the book, the only deaths that are really talked about are, obviously, the very first attack on Christine Watkins and then the death of little Alexander Kintner. Every other death is only simply guessed upon: When Ben Gardener fails to communicate with base while he is out on his boat, people assume he has been eaten. The fact that no body is ever found also convinces everyone that he has been eaten by the huge shark. In the film, the floating severed head coming out of the boat sort of confirms that he is absolutely shark-meat, but the book seems to try and high light how paranoid the little town is becoming. Furthermore, even when the main characters die – Hooper is actually bitten in half by the shark when he is in the shark cage, and Quint is dragged under the water and drowned when his foot gets tangled up in a harpoon rope – you don’t really acre that they’ve died. If anything, I was almost proud of the shark for ending the lives of such horrible characters.

Image result for jaws gifs

4. The shark itself

The book did a wonderful job of making the shark seem like the innocent victim in the situation. He is just a fish, surprisingly clever for a ‘mindless predator’, who is simply just trying to have some dinner and survive. The attitudes in the book highlight just how old the book really is: Written in 1974 the book plays hugely off of the general scariness of sharks. In modern day, and most likely due to the huge success of the film, more and more people are realising that sharks are not mindless killers, that they have intricate and complicated lives that we are still learning about to this days. The solitary lifestyle is something that the book plays on, making it seem that this fish has picked this little town to terrorise. In reality, sharks very rarely attack people, and of these attacks few are ever fatal. When it comes to sharks it is having respect for the sharks home: Don’t swim near seals, if attacked/if a shark gets to close punch it on the nose, or stay close to shore within sights of a life guard. The book (and to some extent the film) is very old fashioned in its view that sharks are nothing but viscous predators, but to some extent that’s what made this book so enjoyable to read.

Final thoughts?

The book is a great read: Story aside Peter Benchley writes in such a way that you can not put the book down. Even just reading about a dinner party he can create tension so thick that you need to keep reading to find out what horrible thing happens. The book constantly puts the reader on edge and has you reading way into the early hours of the morning because you just can’t tear yourself away from it. The film is also excellent: I don’t think I would have researched sharks as much as I have done over the years if not for this film scaring the absolute pants off me when I was 10. Both do an excellent job of telling the same story, but simply with different end goals in mind: The film wants you to cheer for Amity, while the book wants you to cheer for the shark.

Which version did you guys prefer? Let me know in the comments below and follow me for more comparisons! 

T xx