Vintage vs Old

It has long been a trope that if something is vintage then it automatically worth more: Clothing, toys, jewels, furniture. You name it and the chances are that the longer it has been in circulation that the more value it has accrued over that time. Yet these items may not necessarily be ‘old’ items. More importantly, when does something stop being seen as ‘old’ and starts being seen as ‘vintage’?

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‘Vintage’ and ‘old’ are subjective terms: What one person would consider old another person doesn’t mean that it is actually an old item. One clear example of this is in toys: We as adults would look at a toy that has been in circulation for a year and deem it still relative, whereas a child may look at that toy and deem it old because it is not the newest version available to them. The same can also be said for fashion: Your mom may look at her teenage clothing from the 70’s and 80’s equipped with shoulder pads and spikes and see them as an old remnant of her past, whereas a high end thrift store in London would view those clothes as ‘vintage’ time pieces and be able to charge twice their value to sell it on.

The terminology also varies on what the item on question is: If a car is more than 20 years old, it is considered a ‘classic’ and is only known as ‘vintage’ if it was made between 1919 and 1930. ‘Vintage’ originally came from wine making, where ‘vintage’ wines were made from grapes that were grown and harvested within the same year and so are a representation of a very specific year of harvest.

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‘Vintage’ has now also become a sign of quality and is therefore desirable, whereas ‘old’ suggests that the item is simply no longer fit for use and outdated. In reality, while those shoes you have from last year may be technically ‘old’ they still work perfectly well (provided that they have no hole sin the bottom), whereas that vintage car which was made in the 1980’s may break down at every slight curve in the road. See…subjective.

The implications

Since the terminology is subjective, it allows retailers and designers to state what they believe their items should be labelled as. Etsy, for example, requires their users to only name a handmade item as ‘vintage’ if it is at least 20 years old. In the fashion industry, ‘vintage’ is used to describe an item that is easily identifiable to the time in which it was made. Going back to shoulder pads, despite your own personal opinion on whether they are wise fashion choices or not, jackets that contained them would most likely be considered vintage because they are iconic of 80s style.

It can therefore be difficult to distinguish between what is really vintage and what is simply ‘vintage style’, as items that imitate clothing of a particular era are not equal to those items that were originally made in an era. Clothing needs to be of  a particular quality for it to be considered vintage too as it needs to be able to stand the test of time: if that ‘vintage’ shirt starts to fade or the buttons slowly gape after a few washes then it’s probably not ‘real vintage’ but rather an ‘old’ item of clothing.

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The problem with labels is that they are all subjective and can, and most definitely will, change over time as new definitions are determined. If you are truly looking for something vintage it may be best looking for something that you deem as vintage: High quality items from a specific time period that brings that vintage joy into your lives, be it through an old jacket found at your local charity shop to a designer dressing table made in the 1950s. Just because something is labelled ‘vintage’, doesn’t mean it is, and just because something is labelled ‘old’, doesn’t mean it can’t still bring you joy.


Most expensive Star Wars toys

No one can deny that Star Wars is an insanely popular and well-loved franchise. The films have become a stable part of 20th Century cinema and even if you have never watched one of the films, the characters and universes are iconic: EVERYONE has made a ‘I am your father’ joke, as well as encouraged their friends to ‘trust the force’. It is also no surprise that the toys are highly sought after, and for a bit of ease of reference, here is a list of some of the most expensive Star Wars items ever created.

Rocket firing Boba Fett

Unsurprisingly, there are at least three Star Wars toys that are worth a stupid amount of money. The Rocket Firing Boba Fett toy released in 1980 currently sells for around £5,000. The toy was originally sold with a gun that shot out a small plastic rocket, but was quickly recalled when parents started to complain that this could injure their children. The toy was re-released without a firing gun, so naturally the original and almost ‘dangerous’ version is highly sought after by collectors and fans alike.


LEGO Ultimate Collector’s edition Millennium Falcon

Now yes, LEGO have since made roughly 3 other versions of the Millennium Falcon, but the most sought after is the original: Made in 2007 this model consisted of roughly 5195 pieces and was the first ship to be made on ‘mini-figure scale’. Currently selling online for around £3,200.00 it is clearly even more sought after now that it is no longer being made.Image result for lego r2d2Oddly enough, any large scale LEGO Star Wars set is going to be worth big bucks after being discontinued: The large scale R2 D2 model originally sold for around £140 in stores, but now that it has been discontinued for nearly 2 years, it is worth around £450…and that’s out of box and made! Completely sealed packet, that has never before touched bricks, could sell for as much as £800.

Telescopic lightsaber Darth Vader

As with almost all toys, the first run of this toy in 1978 was recalled because the lightsaber could extend and potentially injure the children playing with it. The toy was re-released sans extending lightsaber but it happened so quickly that there are only about 200 versions of the original in existence. Selling for around £6000.00, it is one of the most sought after Star Wars toys going.

Darth Vader war helmet

Ok so technically this is not a ‘toy’ so to speak but rather the actual helmet that Darth vader’s main stunt double wore during filming for ‘The Empire Strikes Back’. This is therefore more of an original film prop, which somewhat explains the £115,000.00 price tag on it currently.

real darth vader

What other Star Wars toys have you guys heard of? Or…which Star Wars toys that you currently own do you reckon will be worth big bucks in a few years time?

T xx